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Kurdish terror and the West; A terrorist is a terrorist, plain and simple

Oct 30, 2007 | Comments Off

The Washington Times

BYLINE: By Tulin Daloglu, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

More than eight years ago, Abdullah Ocalan, leader of the Kurdish terrorist group PKK, was sentenced to life in prison by a Turkish judge in Imrali, Mudanya. As a BBC reporter at the time, I attended the trial. According to my notes, he lost his temper only once: when a group of witnesses who lost family members in the PKK attacks challenged him. The judge, Turgut Okyay, tried to get order in the court as they shouted at Ocalan and showed him photographs of their loved ones. His face stretched back with an expression of contempt, he first stepped on his left foot and stood up fast. “And I have lost 25,000 men!” Ocalan yelled back. Turkey has officially declared 37,000 people killed by the PKK attacks.

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Ankara’s eyes; Turks peer to the east and south

Oct 23, 2007 | Comments Off

The Washington Times

BYLINE: By Tulin Daloglu, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Sometimes, the timing of events has more say than the issue itself to determine its outcome. If the so-called Armenian genocide resolution that recently passed the House Foreign Relations Committee were to reach a floor vote at a time when separatist Kurdish terrorist attacks were not intensifying in Turkey, and if there were no U.S. occupation in Iraq, almost nothing would move House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to re-evaluate her commitment to pass it.

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Armenian debacle; Playing games with national security

Oct 16, 2007 | Comments Off

The Washington Times

BYLINE: By Tulin Daloglu, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she believes that “the biggest ethical challenge facing our country is the war in Iraq.” Therefore, she must believe that passing a resolution declaring the mass killings of Armenians at the end of World War I a genocide will restore America’s moral authority. Rep. Tom Lantos, California Democrat, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said, “I feel that I have a tremendous opportunity as a survivor of the Holocaust to bring a moral dimension to our foreign policy.” The resolution passed last week by a 27?21 vote.

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Turkey Deals Its Future

Oct 12, 2007 | Comments Off

The Globalist

By Tulin Daloglu

Leading Turkey requires the skills of a chess grandmaster. Considering it is a longtime ally of the United States, is located next to Iraq and is being drawn into an intensifying relationship with Iran, Turkey is deciding how to best address its own needs. That includes an assessment about whether the “new world order” shaping up around it will include an America as influential as it used to be.

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Neither Autocrats Nor Islamists

Oct 11, 2007 | Comments Off

The Globalist

By Tulin Daloglu

For centuries, women have been used — as property, as slaves — in the sense of having no rights over their own body. To a troubling degree, this is still the case in much of the Middle East. The larger story here is not one that pits the Muslim world against the West — or Islam against Christianity. It is a struggle for dominance. As Tulin Daloglu argues, what needs to happen is a change in approach — a change in how men in power see the world.
In the past, men played the game of empire, assuming the role of conqueror — while women were generally treated as property, to be traded back and forth. Men ruled empires, controlled women and built civilizations whose currency was power and military superiority.

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Presidential perils; Turks remain at odds

Oct 9, 2007 | Comments Off

The Washington Times

BYLINE: By Tulin Daloglu, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

What would we do without politicians? To begin with, we’d have no one to vote for – and to be honest, sometimes we wish for such a thing. In the end, many of us just are not excited about the people we vote for, and it feels as though they win election because there are so few choices and because we have to elect someone to office. Sometimes we’d love for someone to choose not to seek re-election and open the space for a newcomer as there’s always the hope for discovering someone special.
Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey’s Islamist-rooted and now two-term prime minister, is perceived as such a politician. He is leading Turkey at a time when the war in Iraq rendered his opposition toothless. There is a popular notion that America may be planning something sinister with regard to the different ethnic groups in the region, be it changing Turkey’s sovereign borders or a full-on war with Islam.

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Tainted by PKK; Terrorists poison U.S.-Turkey ties

Oct 2, 2007 | Comments Off

The Washington Times

BYLINE: By Tulin Daloglu, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

When Turkey refused to give the United States a northern front to invade Iraq, the U.S. accused its NATO ally of breaking faith. But NATO did not endorse the war in Iraq, and though it provides training to Iraqi security forces, it refrains from taking an active role on the ground.
Meanwhile, when Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan visited New York last week, he was asked about reasons for anti-Americanism in Turkey. “[W]e have found U.S.-made heavy artillery – such as tanks and cannons – in the PKK camps,” he said. Yet, there is no evidence that the PKK, Kurdish separatist terrorists, are attacking with tanks and cannons. But Mr. Erdogan’s claim forces to light the question of whether Turkey’s refusal to give the United States a northern front into Iraq and American inaction against the PKK are causing Turkey to re-evaluate its NATO membership.

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